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Research Grants API | ANDS Developers

Research Grants API

Research Grants API Documentation

Please note that this API has been superseded by the ANDS Research Activities API. ANDS will continue to support this API until the end of 2016. If you have any questions or concerns please contact services@ands.org.au.

grants_api_diagramThe Research Grants API provides access to data relating to Australian Research Grants and Researchers.

This service allows users to discover published research grants based on their title, or relationship to specific individuals or institutions.

Example use cases for the service include:

  • Populating a lookup form input to search for grant numbers
  • Enabling richer RIF-CS relationship mappings
  • Determining grants that have been allocated to a particular researcher

The service currently provides a searchable index for all grants deposited into the ANDS Registry.

Service Usage

Before you start! To use this service, institutions or individuals must register for a free API key.

Resource URL

http://researchdata.ands.org.au/registry/services/{YOUR API KEY}/getGrants?{params}

  • This API is a RESTful Web Service. Simply replace the blue parameters with the appropriate values and issue a HTTP GET request.
  • Replace {YOUR API KEY} with the key your organisation registered (no API key? register for free)
  • Replace {params} with some combination of the parameters below. Note: all parameter values must be URL-encoded.
  • By default, results are limited to 10 records per request. Use the start and rows parameters to step through additional results.

Service Parameters

Useful Note These parameters have the same meaning as defined by SOLR Common Query Parameters (SOLR enterprise search server).

Parameter Description Example Usage
id the id of the grant (or part thereof) getGrants?id=1031221
title the title of the grant (or part thereof) getGrants?title=cancer
institution filter results to those grants which are managed by this institution getGrants?institution=University%20of%20Sydney
principalInvestigator filter results to those grants which have this principal/lead investigator getGrants?principalInvestigator=Jacob%20George
person filter results to those grants which have this person listed as a lead OR co-investigator getGrants?person=Prof%20Jacob%20George
rows limit the number of grants returned to this number (default: 999) getGrants?title=fish&rows=5
start offset the grants returned by this number (used to “cursor” through large result sets) getGrants?title=fish&rows=15&start=75

Response Format

  • Responses from this service are returned in JSON format. See example below for response schema.
  • Results are wrapped inside a messages object, which is returned when the status is success
  • If no grants matched your result, the messages object will be an empty array

Common Questions

The grant number is unique to the funding organisation. At this stage, the best way to determine both of these pieces of information is to extract them from the key field in the response.
This is a URL-friendly name we allocate to each record in Research Data Australia. Prepend this value with http://researchdata.ands.org.au/{slug} to link to this grant in RDA.
You haven’t correctly specified your API key in the request URL. Check the Service Usage section above.

 


Example Usage

Grants for a particular organisation and researcher

Return all grants whose chief investigator was “Dr Ming Tat (Patrick) Ling” and were managed by Queensland University of Technology:

  • Service Response:
    {
    "status" : "success",
    "message" : {
    	"numFound" : 2,
    	"recordData" :
    	[
    		{
    			"title" : "To study how prostate tumor metastasizes to bone",
    			"key" : "http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1031221",
    			"relations" :
    			{
    				"isManagedBy" : "Queensland University of Technology",
    				"isParticipantIn" : [ "Prof Judith Clements", "Prof Colleen Nelson" ],
    				"isPrincipalInvestigatorOf" : "Dr Ming Tat (Patrick) Ling"
    			},
    			"slug" : "to-study-how-prostate-tumor-metastasizes-to-bone",
    			"description" : "Bone metastasis occurs in more than 80% of cases of advanced prostate cancer (PCa), and is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in PCa patients. Understanding why PCa cells preferentially metastasize to bone may lead to the the development of novel therapy for inhibiting PCa metastasis. This project will study how the bone cell-secreted protein angiopoietin-1 promotes the metastasis of PCa cells to bone and whether inactivation of this protein can inhibit PCa bone metastasis.
    
                               Lead Investigator: Dr Ming Tat (Patrick) Ling
                               
                               Co-Investigator(s): Prof Judith Clements; Prof Colleen Nelson
                               
                               Total Grant Budget: $AUD 555,400
    
                               Application Year: 2011
                               Start Year: 2012
                               End Year: 2014
    
                               Main Funding Group: Research Support
                               Grant Type (Funding Scheme): NHMRC Project Grants
                               Grant Sub Type: Standard Project Grant"
    		},
    
    		{
    			"title" : "To identify a new therapeutic target for the treatment of prostate cancer",
    			"key" : "http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1031228",
    			"relations" :
    			{
    				"isManagedBy" : "Queensland University of Technology",
    				"isParticipantIn" : [ "Prof Pamela Russell", "Prof Ronald Quinn" ],
    				"isPrincipalInvestigatorOf" : "Dr Ming Tat (Patrick) Ling"
    			},
    			"slug" : "to-identify-a-new-therapeutic-target-for-the-treatment-of-prostate-cancer",
    			"description" : "Advanced prostate cancer (PCa) remains the major therapeutic challenge since neither surgery nor systemic therapies are effective at this stage. Recently, we identified a protein called PACE-1 that is essential for PCa cell survival. We plan to investigate the roles of PACE-1 in the development and progression of prostate cancer. We will then test if PACE-1 inactivation alone or in combination with systemic cancer therapies will inhibit prostate tumor growth and disease progression.
    
                               Lead Investigator: Dr Ming Tat (Patrick) Ling
                               
                               Co-Investigator(s): Prof Ronald Quinn; Prof Pamela Russell
                               
                               Total Grant Budget: $AUD 602,253
    
                               Application Year: 2011
                               Start Year: 2012
                               End Year: 2014
    
                               Main Funding Group: Research Support
                               Grant Type (Funding Scheme): NHMRC Project Grants
                               Grant Sub Type: Standard Project Grant"
    		}
    	]
    }
    }

Grants matching a certain title by a particular researcher

Return all grants involving “Prof David Cook” which contain sodium channels in the title:

  • HTTP GET Request:
    getGrants?person=Prof%20David%20Cook&title=sodium%20channels
  • Service Response:
    {
        "status": "success",
        "message": {
    	"numFound": 7,
    	"recordData": [
    	    {
    		"key": "http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1007447",
    		"slug": "how-are-sodium-channels-in-the-kidney-and-the-gastrointestinal-tract-regulated",
    		"title": "How are sodium channels in the kidney and the gastrointestinal tract regulated",
    		"description": "Abnormal sodium absorption in the kidney, gut and lung is implicated in hypertension, cystic fibrosis and pulmonary oedema. Epithelial Na+ channels are a key component of the mechanism by which these organs absorb sodium. The project will investigate the mechanisms by which the activity of these channels is controlled and is intended to discover new approaches to treating abnormal sodium absorption.
    
     Lead Investigator: Prof David Cook
     
     Co-Investigator(s): A/Pr Anuwat Dinudom
     
     Total Grant Budget: $AUD 408,392
    
     Application Year: 2010
     Start Year: 2011
     End Year: 2013
    
     Main Funding Group: Research Support
     Grant Type (Funding Scheme): NHMRC Project Grants
     Grant Sub Type: Standard Project Grant",
    		"relations": {
    		    "isManagedBy": "University of Sydney",
    		    "isPrincipalInvestigatorOf": "Prof David Cook",
    		    "isParticipantIn": "A/Pr Anuwat Dinudom"
    		}
    	    },
    	    {
    		"key": "http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/349320",
    		"slug": "regulation-of-the-epithelial-sodium-channel",
    		"title": "Regulation of the epithelial sodium channel",
    		"description": "The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is a highly specific ion channel expressed in the apical membrane of some tissues. In the kidney, ENaC activity is responsible for maintaining sodium balance, blood volume and blood pressure. In the lung ENaC function is required for fluid clearance. Abnormal regulation of ENaC is associated with conditions such as hypertension, cystic fibrosis and pulmonary oedema. Delineating the molecular basis of the regulation of ENaC is vital in understanding disease mechanisms and in defining targets for novel therapeutics for the treatment of disorders that arise due to sodium imbalance. Furthermore, ENaC and the molecules involved in the channel regulatory cascade are potential candidate genes in defining the genetic causes of human hypertension and salt wasting disorders. Previous studies from our laboratories and by other groups have shown that Nedd4 and Nedd4-2 proteins are key players in regulating ENaC activity. Our recent NHMRC supported work has identified another important protein, Grk2, as a regulator of ENaC. The work proposed in this application is an extension of our recent findings and will enable us to fully define how Nedd4-Nedd4-2 and Grk2 regulate the activity of ENaC.
    
     Lead Investigator: Prof Sharad Kumar
     
     Co-Investigator(s): Prof David Cook; A/Pr Anuwat Dinudom
     
     Total Grant Budget: $AUD 471,000
    
     Application Year: 2004
     Start Year: 2005
     End Year: 2007
    
     Main Funding Group: Research Support
     Grant Type (Funding Scheme): NHMRC Project Grants
     Grant Sub Type: Standard Project Grant",
    		"relations": {
    		    "isManagedBy": "University of Adelaide",
    		    "isPrincipalInvestigatorOf": "Prof Sharad Kumar",
    		    "isParticipantIn": [
    			"Prof David Cook",
    			"A/Pr Anuwat Dinudom"
    		    ]
    		}
    	    },
    	    {
    		"key": "http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/253739",
    		"slug": "how-are-epithelial-sodium-channels-controlled",
    		"title": "How are epithelial sodium channels controlled?",
    		"description": "The regulation of sodium transport by the epithelial sodium channel is essential for the maintenance of blood pressure and the correct amount of fluid in the respiratory tract and gut. Hyperactivity of the sodium channels leads to increased blood pressure and clogging of the gut and bronchi due to dehydration of the surface fluid. Reductions in the activity of the sodium channels lead to abnormally low blood pressure and the accumulation of fluid in the lungs such as occurs in influenza, high altitude pulmonary oedema and in cardiogenic pulmonary oedema. The present project will examine the mechanisms by which sodium channels are regulated. It will focus on the mechanisms by which cytosolic chloride and inflammatory mediators regulate the activity of the channels.
    
     Lead Investigator: Dr Anuwat Dinudom
     
     Co-Investigator(s): A/Pr Anuwat Dinudom; Prof David Cook; Prof John Young
     
     Total Grant Budget: $AUD 219,750
    
     Application Year: 2002
     Start Year: 2003
     End Year: 2005
    
     Main Funding Group: Research Support
     Grant Type (Funding Scheme): NHMRC Project Grants
     Grant Sub Type: Standard Project Grant",
    		"relations": {
    		    "isManagedBy": "University of Sydney",
    		    "isParticipantIn": "Prof David Cook",
    		    "isPrincipalInvestigatorOf": "A/Pr Anuwat Dinudom"
    		}
    	    },
    	    {
    		"key": "http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/207708",
    		"slug": "a-new-regulator-of-sodium-ion-channel-in-epithelia",
    		"title": "A new regulator of sodium ion channel in epithelia",
    		"description": "The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is a highly specific ion channel expressed in the apical membrane of some tissues. In the distal nephron of the kidney, ENaC activity is responsible for maintaining sodium balance, blood volume and blood pressure. In the lung ENaC function is required for fluid clearance. Delineating the molecular basis of the regulation of ENaC is vital in understanding disease mechanisms and in defining targets for novel therapeutics for the treatment of disorders that arise due to sodium imbalance. Furthermore, ENaC and the molecules involved in the channel regulatory cascade are potential candidate genes in defining the genetic causes of human hypertension and salt wasting disorders. Previous studies from our laboratories and by other groups have implicated Nedd4, a protein initially cloned by us, as a key player in regulating ENaC. Our recent data suggest that KIAA0439, a close relative of Nedd4, is also involved in ENaC control mechanisms. The work proposed in this application is an extension of our recent findings and will enable us to fully define how KIAA0439 regulates the activity of ENaC.
    
     Lead Investigator: Prof Sharad Kumar
     
     Co-Investigator(s): Prof David Cook; A/Pr Anuwat Dinudom
     
     Total Grant Budget: $AUD 452,640
    
     Application Year: 2001
     Start Year: 2002
     End Year: 2004
    
     Main Funding Group: Research Support
     Grant Type (Funding Scheme): NHMRC Project Grants
     Grant Sub Type: Standard Project Grant",
    		"relations": {
    		    "isManagedBy": "University of Adelaide",
    		    "isPrincipalInvestigatorOf": "Prof Sharad Kumar",
    		    "isParticipantIn": [
    			"Prof David Cook",
    			"A/Pr Anuwat Dinudom"
    		    ]
    		}
    	    },
    	    {
    		"key": "http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/211138",
    		"slug": "how-sodium-channels-are-controlled",
    		"title": "How sodium channels are controlled",
    		"description": "The regulation of transport of salt into and out of thebody is essential for the maintenance of blood pressure, and for the maintenance of the correct amount of fluid in the respiratory passages and gut. A critical component of the mechanism by which the body transports salt are sodium channels. Overactivity of these channels leads to increased blood pressure and clogging of the gut and the bronchi due to thick and sticky secretions. Reduced activity leads to abnormally low blood pressure, as well as to accumulation of fluid in the lungs such as occurs in influenza and in altitude sickness. The present project will examine the mechanisms by which sodium channels are regulated. It will particularly focus on the mechanisms by which sodium channels are switched off when the salt content of cells is too high.
    
     Lead Investigator: Prof David Cook
     
     Co-Investigator(s): Prof John Young
     
     Total Grant Budget: $AUD 466,980
    
     Application Year: 2001
     Start Year: 2002
     End Year: 2004
    
     Main Funding Group: Research Support
     Grant Type (Funding Scheme): NHMRC Project Grants
     Grant Sub Type: Standard Project Grant",
    		"relations": {
    		    "isManagedBy": "University of Sydney",
    		    "isPrincipalInvestigatorOf": "Prof David Cook"
    		}
    	    },
    	    {
    		"key": "http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/153938",
    		"slug": "how-are-sodium-channels-controlled-in-the-kidney",
    		"title": "How are sodium channels controlled in the kidney?",
    		"description": "The transport of sodium ions by the kidney, gut and lungs not only regulates blood pressure, it also regulates the amount of fluid in the gut and in the lungs. One of the most important proteins that underlie the transport of sodium in these tissues is the so-called epithelial sodium channel. The activity of these epithelial sodium channels is regulated by a wide variety of systems. Some of these regulatory systems act in response to changes in the body's requirements for sodium transport. Others act in response to changes in capacity of cells in which the sodium channels are found to continue transporting sodium. In this project we will study the mechanisms that regulate the activity of the epithelial sodium channels, and in particular, how these mechanisms interact so as to maintain a level of sodium channel activity that is appropriate to both the needs of the organism and to the needs of the sodium transporting cells. The outcomes of this project will be improved understanding of the function of the kidney, gut and lungs in both health and disease. It may also lead to novel drug targets for treatment of major diseases in which the activity of sodium channels is abnormal. These disease include hypertension, cystic fibrosis, pulmonary oedema and influenza.
    
     Lead Investigator: Prof David Cook
     
     Co-Investigator(s): Prof John Young
     
     Total Grant Budget: $AUD 227,037
    
     Application Year: 2000
     Start Year: 2001
     End Year: 2003
    
     Main Funding Group: Research Support
     Grant Type (Funding Scheme): NHMRC Project Grants
     Grant Sub Type: Standard Project Grant",
    		"relations": {
    		    "isManagedBy": "University of Sydney",
    		    "isPrincipalInvestigatorOf": "Prof David Cook"
    		}
    	    },
    	    {
    		"key": "http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/990351",
    		"slug": "control-of-sodium-channels",
    		"title": "Control of Sodium Channels",
    		"description": "Lead Investigator: Prof David Cook
     
     Total Grant Budget: $AUD 394,485
    
     Application Year: 1998
     Start Year: 1999
     End Year: 2001
    
     Main Funding Group: Research Support
     Grant Type (Funding Scheme): NHMRC Project Grants
     Grant Sub Type: Standard Project Grant",
    		"relations": {
    		    "isManagedBy": "University of Sydney",
    		    "isPrincipalInvestigatorOf": "Prof David Cook"
    		}
    	    }
    	]
        }
    
    }
     

 

Comments 2


  1. Ollie

    &rows and &start don’t seem to work. I’m getting 999 rows starting from the first row no matter what values I use.

    • ands_admin Post author

      Hi Ollie,

      Sorry for late reply. I did not receive a notification that a comment had been made. The rows and start parameter are not working in version 1 of this api. We are releasing version 2 of the grants api in 2 weeks. In version 2 the rows and start parameters are working as expected and a number of other parameters have been added.

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